Nursing Intervention for Colon Cancer (Colorectal Cancer)

Nursing Intervention for Colon Cancer (Colorectal Cancer)


Cancer of The Colon and Rectum


The colon is the part of the digestive system where the waste material is stored. The rectum is the end of the colon adjacent to the anus. Together, they form a long, muscular tube called the large intestine (also known as the large bowel). Tumors of the colon and rectum are growths arising from the inner wall of the large intestine. Benign tumors of the large intestine are called polyps. Malignant tumors of the large intestine are called cancers. Benign polyps do not invade nearby tissue or spread to other parts of the body. Benign polyps can be easily removed during colonoscopy and are not life-threatening. If benign polyps are not removed from the large intestine, they can become malignant (cancerous) over time. Most of the cancers of the large intestine are believed to have developed from polyps. Cancer of the colon and rectum (also referred to as colorectal cancer) can invade and damage adjacent tissues and organs. Cancer cells can also break away and spread to other parts of the body (such as liver and lung) where new tumors form. The spread of colon cancer to distant organs is called metastasis of the colon cancer. Once metastasis has occurred in colorectal cancer, a complete cure of the cancer is unlikely.


Nursing Intervention for Colon Cancer (Colorectal Cancer)

Maintaining Elimination.
Monitor the frequency and consistency of defecation. Laxatives and enemas given as prescribed. Patients who show signs of progress towards the obstruction totally prepared to undergo surgery.

Eliminate Pain.
Analgesic prescription. Environment is made conducive to relaxation with dim lights, turn off the television or radio, and limiting visitors and phone if desired by the patient. Measures additional convenience offered a change of position, rubbing his back, and relaxation techniques.

Increasing Tolerance Activities.
Assess the patient's activity tolerance. Activities changed and is scheduled to allow an adequate period of bed rest in an effort to reduce fatigue patients. Blood component therapy prescription if the patient is suffering from severe anemia. If blood transfusion is given, the general safety guidelines and institutional policies regarding security measures must be followed. Improved postoperative activity and tolerance monitored.

Providing nutritional measures.
If the patient's condition allows, a diet high in calories, protein, and carbohydrates and low in residue be given to preoperative period for a few days to provide adequate nutrition and minimize peristaltic cramps by lowering the excess. Total parenteral nutrition given to some patients to replace the depletion of nutrients, vitamins and minerals. Daily body weight were recorded and physicians are notified when a patient continues to experience weight loss when receiving parenteral nutrition.